Bringing firewood to campgrounds

Posted by: artgirl

Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 09:12 AM

Does anyone know if campgrounds allow you to bring firewood with you.I know state parks do not allow this.Or is it based individually on each campgrounds rules?
Posted by: Grizzly Girl

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 09:38 AM

I believe it is based on each campground but I could be wrong. I know that we take our own fire wood when we camp. It is just way to expensive to keep buying what they sell.
Posted by: bfg344

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 12:14 PM

I think that was what I always knew to be true.Individually based.
Posted by: mikhen

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 03:08 PM

There used to be a law about moving firewood. There was a thread on here a few years ago about it, and when it was cancelled.
Posted by: HappyCamper2

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 06:44 PM

However, some states still do not allow you to bring in firewood, Virginia and I believe Tennessee are two that I know about. I am pretty sure that still holds. As far as this state goes, a lot of campgrounds and even state parks still don't allow it, check with the individual area and campground you are going to just to be sure.
Posted by: mikhen

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/18/13 07:07 PM

This is an excerpt from the thread a free years ago. As far as I can tell, this is how it stands now.

News for Immediate Release Feb. 18, 2011
State Lifts Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine, Federal Quarantine Remains Pennsylvania Hardwoods Industry will Benefit from Changes
Harrisburg – The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced that the state Emerald Ash Borer quarantine restricting the in-state movement of ash materials and all hardwood firewood will be lifted April 15. However, a federal quarantine remains in effect.
The Emerald Ash Borer is a highly invasive, wood-boring beetle that kills ash trees and poses a threat to the state’s $25 billion hardwoods industry.
“Lifting our quarantine will allow free movement on Emerald Ash Borer-regulated materials within Pennsylvania,” said acting Agriculture Secretary George Greig. “As Emerald Ash Borer has moved rapidly across the state, the in-state quarantine restrictions no longer serve a productive purpose.”
Because of the beetle’s aggressive movement across Pennsylvania, the in-state quarantine – initially intended to slow the pest’s spread – is now unnecessary.
Since 2007, when the Emerald Ash Borer was first observed in Butler County, the pest has been found in 17 additional counties, including Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Centre, Clarion, Cumberland, Fulton, Indiana, Juniata, Lawrence, Mercer, Mifflin, Somerset, Union, Washington and Westmoreland.
The state quarantine includes the counties where the beetle was found in addition to the contiguous counties, for a total of 43.
A parallel federal quarantine, also established in 2007, will remain effective in Pennsylvania to help stop the spread into other states. International and federal interstate restrictions will apply to exporting Emerald Ash Borer-regulated materials from Pennsylvania to non-quarantined domestic areas and regulating countries.
Greig added that Pennsylvania remains committed to finding ways to control the beetle, which in turn will protect the state’s important hardwoods industry.
The quarantine initially restricted the movement of ash nursery stock, green lumber, and any other ash material, including logs, stumps, roots and branches, from the quarantine area. Because it is difficult to distinguish between species of hardwood firewood, all hardwood firewood—including ash, oak, maple and hickory— was quarantined.
The Emerald Ash Borer is native to China and eastern Asia. The pest likely arrived in North America in wooden shipping crates. It was first detected in July 2002 in southeastern Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
In addition to Pennsylvania, the beetle is attacking ash trees in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.
Typically, the Emerald Ash Borer beetles will kill an ash tree within three years of the initial infestation. Adults are dark green, one-half inch in length and one-eighth inch wide, and fly only from early May until September. Larvae spend the rest of the year beneath the bark of ash trees. When they emerge as adults, they leave D- shaped holes in the bark about one-eighth inch wide.
For more information about the quarantine, contact Walt Blosser at 717-772-5205, and for more information about Emerald Ash Borer, contact Sven-Erik Spichiger at 717-772-5229.
Media contact: Jean Kummer, 717-787-5085 ###
Posted by: HappyCamper2

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/19/13 04:28 PM

Good info Mike
Posted by: HappyCamper2

Re: Bringing firewood to campgrounds - 07/27/13 06:18 AM

hijack Our friends at Lerch RV posted this in another area:

News for Immediate Release
Feb. 18, 2011

State Lifts Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine, Federal Quarantine Remains

Pennsylvania Hardwoods Industry will Benefit from Changes
Harrisburg –

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced that
the state Emerald Ash Borer quarantine restricting the in-state movement of ash
materials and all hardwood firewood will be lifted April 15,2011. However, a federal
quarantine remains in effect.

The Emerald Ash Borer is a highly invasive, wood-boring beetle that kills ash trees
and poses a threat to the state’s $25 billion hardwoods industry.
“Lifting our quarantine will allow free movement on Emerald Ash Borer-regulated
materials within Pennsylvania,” said acting Agriculture Secretary George Greig. “As
Emerald Ash Borer has moved rapidly across the state, the in-state quarantine
restrictions no longer serve a productive purpose.”
Because of the beetle’s aggressive movement across Pennsylvania, the in-state
quarantine – initially intended to slow the pest’s spread – is now unnecessary.

Since 2007, when the Emerald Ash Borer was first observed in Butler County, the
pest has been found in 17 additional counties, including Allegheny, Armstrong,
Beaver, Bedford, Centre, Clarion, Cumberland, Fulton, Indiana, Juniata, Lawrence,
Mercer, Mifflin, Somerset, Union, Washington and Westmoreland.
The state quarantine includes the counties where the beetle was found in addition
to the contiguous counties, for a total of 43.

A parallel federal quarantine, also established in 2007, will remain effective in
Pennsylvania to help stop the spread into other states. International and federal
interstate restrictions will apply to exporting Emerald Ash Borer-regulated materials
from Pennsylvania to non-quarantined domestic areas and regulating countries.
Greig added that Pennsylvania remains committed to finding ways to control the
beetle, which in turn will protect the state’s important hardwoods industry.
The quarantine initially restricted the movement of ash nursery stock, green
lumber, and any other ash material, including logs, stumps, roots and branches,
from the quarantine area. Because it is difficult to distinguish between species of
hardwood firewood, all hardwood firewood—including ash, oak, maple and hickory—
was quarantined.

The Emerald Ash Borer is native to China and eastern Asia. The pest likely arrived
in North America in wooden shipping crates. It was first detected in July 2002 in
southeastern Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
In addition to Pennsylvania, the beetle is attacking ash trees in Illinois, Indiana,
Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio,
Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Typically, the Emerald Ash Borer beetles will kill an ash tree within three years of
the initial infestation. Adults are dark green, one-half inch in length and one-eighth
inch wide, and fly only from early May until September. Larvae spend the rest of
the year beneath the bark of ash trees. When they emerge as adults, they leave Dshaped
holes in the bark about one-eighth inch wide.
For more information about the quarantine, contact Walt Blosser at 717-772-5205,
and for more information about Emerald Ash Borer, contact Sven-Erik Spichiger at
717-772-5229.
Media contact: Jean Kummer, 717-787-5085
###[i][/i]